News and Media.

Mental Health in the News

By Royal Appointment

Yesterday, our Founding Director Rachael had the immense privilege of visiting Buckingham Palace and attending a reception hosted by TRH the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge with Prince Harry.

It was a wonderful evening, hearing speeches from the Duke of Cambridge and the President of Mind, Stephen Fry.  What was perhaps most inspirational was hearing about the incredible work all over the UK being done to combat the stigma of mental illness; from long time volunteers with the Samaritans to teachers who are leading the way in creating mentally healthy schools.

It was an unforgettable evening and one Rachael honoured and humbled to have been a part of.

Below are some of the official photographs from the evening.

New Course Modules!

To mark World Mental Health Day and the beginning of our #Sanctuary campaign we are excited to offer two additional modules as a part of our ThinkTwice Course.

The two modules will be on Bipolar Disorder and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. With 2% of the population living with bipolar disorder and 4% of adults living with PTSD we want to expand our course to include these often misunderstood conditions.

For more information on our course check out http://www.thinktwiceinfo.org/course

 

Suicide Rates Falling

This morning the suicide statistics for the past year have been released and, on the whole, it’s good news. Suicide rates are at their lowest since 2011. There has been a 9.7% drop in the number of women dying by suicide, middle aged men are still at the highest risk of suicide and sadly Scotland has seen a 7% rise in the number of people dying by suicide in the past year.

It’s amazing to see the work of the National Suicide Prevention Strategy for England is having an effect with the rates of suicide falling overall – breaking the silence and stigma around suicide saves lives.

As ever the report highlights those at the highest risk of suicide; and this year it highlighted the role of divorce in male suicide with divorced men three times more likely to take their own lives that those in a relationship. It also noted that people among the most deprived 10% of society are more than twice as likely to die from suicide than the least deprived 10% of society.

It seems to me that these statistics provide a great challenge for our church communities; to ensure that those going through relationship breakdown are supported and not excluded from church family events and to be aware of the mental health of those struggling with poverty; perhaps those who visit our food banks or lunch clubs. Let’s not be afraid to talk about emotions in our churches and community projects.

Even one suicide is too many; because suicide is preventable. Let’s keep the conversation going; speaking of suicide and speaking of hope.

 

The End of the Stiff Upper Lip?

You probably remember where you were when you first heard the news.

I’d crept downstairs to watch my early morning cartoons and to my disgust it was rolling news on every single channel and they were all telling the same story.

Diana, the Princess of Wales had died in a car crash.

When I told my Mum as she came down to make breakfast later that morning, she didn’t believe me until she saw the news with her own eyes.

The death of the “People’s Princess” marked a sea change in the way our country dealt with emotions. The outpouring of grief that greeted the news was something never seen before; thousands of flowers were laid to remember the Princess and people cried openly.

The outpouring of public grief that was unprecedented and even aged seven I sensed the heavy emotion that hung in the air over the following days.

And part of her legacy, is a willing openness to talk about emotions and mental health in a way that had not been done before. Her Panorama interview talking about her ongoing struggle in with an eating disorder may not seem to be groundbreaking today, but Diana began a conversation about mental health long before it was at the forefront of   political campaigns.

Her and life and her death changed the way we not only expect our royals to behave, but it also called into question the quintessentially British ‘stiff upper lip’ in times of turmoil. The crowds who cried openly on the streets of London in the days after death have become a symbol of a new kind of Britain which is not afraid to wear its heart on its sleeve and talk about mental health.

Twenty years on, and Princes William and Harry, along with Catherine are also doing their bit for mental health awareness with their Heads Together campaign.

Mental health awareness has come a long way in the twenty years since her death and I for one am thankful for her openness that began the journey towards the end of the stiff upper lip.

Media

Rachael on Premier Drive with Loretta Andrews

Rachael speaking on Premier Woman to Woman.

Featured in Will van Der Hart’s article “Using the S Word”, Christianity Magazine.